The Columbian: Just Say No to Oil Terminal

Having provided months of thorough coverage of the Tesaro/Savage proposal, the Columbian came out flat against the terminal in an editorial published on January 12 —

Tesoro-Savage proposal bad for safety, economic development, quality of life

—  In the end, it’s no contest: The drawbacks to building an oil terminal at the Port of Vancouver greatly outweigh the benefits of such a plan, and state officials eventually should reject the proposal.

At the heart of the issues are the future of Vancouver’s waterfront, the local economy, the quality of life for residents, safety concerns, and the image the city wishes to portray to the rest of the world. On each count, the proposal approved by port commissioners comes up short:

• The deal reached with Tesoro Corp. and Savage Companies is butting heads with a $1.3 billion redevelopment of the former Boise Cascade site along the Columbia River, less than two miles upriver from the proposed oil terminal. Given the proximity of the projects and the fact that oil-bearing trains would pass within 100 feet of much of the development, these proposals are, indeed, mutually exclusive. It is unrealistic to think the waterfront development would not be hampered by the oil terminal, and a mixed-use project would have far greater growth potential for the city.

• The proposed $110 million oil terminal would bring an estimated 120 full-time jobs to the port, handling as much as 380,000 barrels of crude per day. It would be worth at least $45 million to the port for the first 10 years of the agreement. But broad-based economic development such as that provided by the waterfront development would have more far-reaching economic benefits.

• Trains carrying up to 380,000 barrels of crude per day through the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Washougal, Camas, and then Vancouver, would do little to enhance the region’s quality of life. Port Commissioner Brian Wolfe said at a recent public meeting that BNSF Railway currently is operating at full capacity and that it’s the railroad company’s responsibility to address that, not the port’s. That is not an adequate answer. Considering a spate of oil-train explosions in North America over the past six months, port officials must do more to reassure the public regarding safety concerns.

• That brings us to an inconvenient truth: Nothing could adequately reassure the public regarding safety concerns. The fact is, regardless of how many safeguards are in place, transporting oil is fraught with peril, and transporting it through heavily populated areas is an invitation to disaster.

• Cities throughout the country in recent decades have repurposed their waterways and riverfronts. What once were conduits for heavy industry now are locations for tourism, service industries, and white-collar jobs, and that speaks to what kind of image Vancouver wishes to cultivate. Look at it this way: Will residents more effectively promote their city by telling outsiders, “Hey, we have a new oil terminal and lots more trains going through the heart of the city,” or by saying, “We have an amazing new waterfront development along the majestic Columbia River”? Or look at it this way: If Vancouver were being built from scratch, the last thing officials would do is put railroad access along the waterfront. It would be a travesty to exacerbate that unfortunate situation by becoming more reliant upon already crowded rail lines.

More than 31,000 public comments regarding the oil terminal were received by the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council, which will determine which factors to consider and then launch a lengthy evaluation process. Eventually, Gov. Jay Inslee will have the final say on whether the proposal is approved. Because of the proposal’s vast, long-lasting impact upon Vancouver, every possible environmental and economic factor should be considered. If that happens, the final decision will be no contest.

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Another Oil Train Blows Up, Because That’s What They Do

Major fire in New Brunswick after derailment–

Sightline–Eric de Place, January 8, 2014 —

 

This one in New Brunswick:

A Canadian National Railway Co. (CNR) train carrying crude oil and propane derailed in the eastern province of New Brunswick and sparked a blaze that was still burning more than 12 hours after the accident.

A helicopter is being brought in today to pinpoint what is ablaze in the wreckage of the 122-car train that jumped the tracks… There are 14 cars and a locomotive in the fire zone, Feeny said.

About 50 to 60 people were evacuated in a two-kilometer (1.2 mile) radius of the accident…

When oil trains explode or catch fire, they are incredibly dangerous. In New Brunswick, for example, it took emergency responders about half a day just to get aerial surveillance of the wreckage and figure out how to safely get ground crews near the accident. Normally, there is little fire fighters can do to extinguish the blaze; the response is generally to try to evacuate the vicinity and let blaze burn itself out.

No one was injured or killed in this latest incident, thank goodness, but the mishap is more evidence that loaded oil tanker cars are ticking time bombs. Trains carrying Bakken crude are now rolling through small towns and major cities every day. And when they explode in a place where people live—as happened in Quebec—the result is awful: dozens of people incinerated and whole city blocks leveled.

The consequences of another oil train explosion in an urban area is chilling to contemplate. It could happen in Belltown or Burlington, Spokane or Sprague. The oil trains are in our neighborhoods already.

More news coverage here.

This post is 14 in the Sightline series: The Northwest’s Pipeline on Rails

Photo by Christopher Sessums, cc.

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Casselton, N.D. residents flee town after oil train explosion

Minneapolis Star Tribune– David Shaffer and Susan Hogan, December 31, 2013 — CASSELTON, N.D.

Officials on Monday night were calling for the evacuation of the entire town of Casselton, N.D., after a BNSF grain train derailed and crashed into a crude oil train in North Dakota on Monday afternoon, causing tank cars to explode in towering mushroom-cloud flames.

No one was injured in the accident that happened about 2:10 p.m. near Casselton, about 20 miles west of Fargo, but smoke billowed for hours.

Monday night, however, the Cass County Sheriff’s Office was “strongly recommending” that the town’s 2,300 residents leave immediately. Those who live within 5 miles south and east of the city also were told to leave.

“Information from the National Weather Service indicates a shift in the weather resulting in a high pressure system that will push the plume of smoke down increasing the risk of potential health hazards,” the sheriff’s office said in a news release.

Amy McBeth, a spokeswoman for BNSF, said a grain train derailed on a track parallel to an eastbound crude oil train with 106 tank cars, striking some of the tanks and triggering explosions.

It was not clear how many tank cars were struck, nor how many were burning, she said.

“It was black smoke and then there were probably four explosions in the next hour to hour and a half,” said Eva Fercho, a Casselton resident who saw the fiery aftermath.

An estimated 11 to 12 crude oil unit trains depart daily from the oil region in western North Dakota. Lacking sufficient pipelines, 69 percent of the state’s oil is currently shipped to market by rail. The main railroads, BNSF and Canadian Pacific, have tracks through the Twin Cities.

Fercho said the BNSF main line runs right through Casselton, and just two blocks from her home.

“We are very thankful it didn’t happen in the city limits,” she said.

The accident also spared the Tharaldson Ethanol plant, west of Casselton. Plant Manager Ryan Carter said the accident was about 2 miles away from the plant, but the burning tank cars were visible from there.

“It was pretty much flames and smoke,” said Carter, who estimated that about 30 tank cars were involved.

Carter Hackmann, who lives about a mile away from the site of the wreck, said he heard at least three explosions, and took photographs from his house of billowing flames and smoke that resembled a mushroom cloud.

The city sent out e-mail alerts warning people to stay indoors.

North Dakota officials have said that even more crude oil is expected to move by rail in 2014. The state is approaching 1 million barrels per day in output, and trails only Texas and the separately counted Gulf of Mexico in U.S. oil production.

In July, a runaway train loaded with North Dakota crude oil crashed in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, killing 47 people and destroying that city’s downtown as tank cars exploded and burned.

Officials on Monday night were calling for the evacuation of the entire town of Casselton, N.D., after a BNSF grain train derailed and crashed into a crude oil train in North Dakota on Monday afternoon, causing tank cars to explode in towering mushroom-cloud flames.

No one was injured in the accident that happened about 2:10 p.m. near Casselton, about 20 miles west of Fargo, but smoke billowed for hours.

Monday night, however, the Cass County Sheriff’s Office was “strongly recommending” that the town’s 2,300 residents leave immediately. Those who live within 5 miles south and east of the city also were told to leave.

“Information from the National Weather Service indicates a shift in the weather resulting in a high pressure system that will push the plume of smoke down increasing the risk of potential health hazards,” the sheriff’s office said in a news release.

Amy McBeth, a spokeswoman for BNSF, said a grain train derailed on a track parallel to an eastbound crude oil train with 106 tank cars, striking some of the tanks and triggering explosions.

It was not clear how many tank cars were struck, nor how many were burning, she said.

“It was black smoke and then there were probably four explosions in the next hour to hour and a half,” said Eva Fercho, a Casselton resident who saw the fiery aftermath.

An estimated 11 to 12 crude oil unit trains depart daily from the oil region in western North Dakota. Lacking sufficient pipelines, 69 percent of the state’s oil is currently shipped to market by rail. The main railroads, BNSF and Canadian Pacific, have tracks through the Twin Cities.

Fercho said the BNSF main line runs right through Casselton, and just two blocks from her home.

“We are very thankful it didn’t happen in the city limits,” she said.

The accident also spared the Tharaldson Ethanol plant, west of Casselton. Plant Manager Ryan Carter said the accident was about 2 miles away from the plant, but the burning tank cars were visible from there.

“It was pretty much flames and smoke,” said Carter, who estimated that about 30 tank cars were involved.

Carter Hackmann, who lives about a mile away from the site of the wreck, said he heard at least three explosions, and took photographs from his house of billowing flames and smoke that resembled a mushroom cloud.

The city sent out e-mail alerts warning people to stay indoors.

North Dakota officials have said that even more crude oil is expected to move by rail in 2014. The state is approaching 1 million barrels per day in output, and trails only Texas and the separately counted Gulf of Mexico in U.S. oil production.

In July, a runaway train loaded with North Dakota crude oil crashed in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, killing 47 people and destroying that city’s downtown as tank cars exploded and burned.

More here

Bruce Crummy/The Associated Press

 

 

Coal Trains Run into Stiff Resistance in U.S.

The InterPress– Matthew Charles Cardinale, December 27, 2013 — SPOKANE, Wa.

Citizens and activists in the U.S. Pacific Northwest are fighting three different proposed coal terminals, including one in Oregon and two in Washington.

Meanwhile, three formerly proposed coal terminals have already been defeated. Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign recently cited these defeats as signs of progress in the broader campaign to retire the use of coal plants across the U.S. altogether.3

“There are three main reasons we oppose coal exports,” Trip Jennings, organiser for Portland Rising Tide, told IPS.

“The first reason – I think the most important for us – is the fact that we’re closing down power plants in the U.S.,” he said. “Oregon and Washington will be totally coal-free in a number of years. We as a community and as citizens decided we didn’t want to burn coal. If we allow corporations to export… it undercuts all the work that we’ve done to address the climate crisis.”

“Second, this has a huge impact on the number of trains that are coming through this area. It creates a situation where we’re committed to shipping highly destructive commodities, rather than shipping people or clean resources on our rails,” Jennings said.

“Third is the dust that is created when these cars lose one pound of dust per car per mile. They’re sprinkling the countryside, the rivers, streams, and communities with toxic, dirty coal dust .”

On May 8, energy company Kinder-Morgan abandoned plans to build a massive export terminal near Clatskanie, Oregon along the Columbia River, which would have exported 15 to 30 million tonnes of coal overseas each year from the Powder River Basin.

On Apr. 1, energy company Metro Ports, the last remaining investor in a proposed Coos Bay Terminal, in Coos Bay, Oregon, allowed its negotiating contract to expire.

International investors Mitsui & Co. of Japan and the Korean Electric Power Corporation had already withdrawn from negotiations. This terminal would have allowed for the shipment of eight to 10 million tonnes of coal each year.

The third victory for activists occurred last August, when Rail America withdrew plans for a coal terminal at the Port of Greys Harbor in Hoquiam, Washington, that would have transported about five million tonnes of coal each year.

The terminals still pending include a two-port plan called Morrow Pacific, in Morrow and St. Helens, Oregon; the Millennium Bulk Terminal at the Port of Longview, Washington; and the Gateway Pacific Terminal in Bellingham, Washington.

The Power Past Coal coalition, Portland Rising Tide and Idaho Rising Tide, the Backbone Campaign, Occupy Spokane, Spokane Riverkeeper, and the Sierra Club, are groups that have been involved in opposing these projects.

Portland Rising Tide, founded in 2007, is part of an international network of groups that works to address the root causes of climate change. It started in Europe and expanded to the U.S. in 2006.

According to Jennings, ” also blankets the rivers and streams with toxic dust, killing salmon, preventing salmon from continuing to spawn where they’ve spawned for millions of years. We’ve spent so many resources in the Northwest rehabilitating and protecting our salmon runs. These trains come in and they’ll be blanketing our salmon spawning beds with toxic coal dust.”

The coal would come from mines at the Powder River Basin in northeast Wyoming and the Tongue River Basin in eastern Montana. The proposed trains would bring the coal through the Columbia River Gorge, to boats. It would then be brought by train south through Portland and Vancouver, Washington, where the trains would turn north or continue west to one of the proposed port terminals.

Spokane, Washington would be impacted by any one of the three current coal train proposals, because they would all come through the city. Many residents there are concerned the increased train traffic will increase the number of times each day that traffic is stopped, meaning that emergency vehicles will not be able to get through.

Over 400 people attended a public hearing regarding the Millennium Bulk Terminal proposal in September 2013; most who attended were in opposition to the train.

At the hearing, Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart held up a bag of coal that he and other residents have collected, containing whole pieces of coal that had fallen off previous coal train shipments. The trains can lose up to one tonne of coal during their journey, advocates say.

Overall, the Millennium Bulk Terminal galvanised some 164,000 citizens to submit comments to the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prior to the end of the comment period last month.

Meanwhile, the Power Past Coal coalition, which itself is a coalition of groups, has largely spent its time focusing on the regulatory and permitting processes.

One victory from their participation in the environmental impact statement process is that the county and state agreed to consider the environmental impact not only of the carbon emissions in transporting the coal, but also the emissions that will result when the coal is consumed, for the Gateway Pacific Terminal proposal.

However, no government agency has agreed to include in its environmental impact study “what kind of pollutants are going to occur in cities that have no other connection other than that they’re a pass-through city to the ports,” Cullen Gatten, who participated as a legal observer of the protests outside the recent hearing in Spokane, on behalf of the National Lawyers Guild, told IPS.

“China is also slowly moving away from using coal. They’re looking at clean energy, too. They may use it now, but… there is some concern they are going to move on before we excavate all the coal,” Gatten said.

The most significant international investor, involved in two out of three of the proposals, is Ambre Energy, an Australian firm.

At the beginning of this week, Liz Fuller, a spokeswoman for Ambre Energy, asked IPS to email a list of questions, but the company did not respond to them.

Recently, the coal terminal proposals became an issue in the elections for county commissioners in Whatcom County, Oregon, where anti-terminal candidates won a majority of the seats on the board.

As a result, the Gateway Pacific Terminal proposal may be doomed, Gatten said.

Trust.org

 

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Security now standard cost of moving a megaload

Works for us…

earthfix.opb.org – Jessica Robinson, January 3, 2014 — Spokane, WA —

New Year Likely To Bring More ‘Megaload’ Fights —

Two large pieces of oil equipment crossing the Northwest are expected to start moving again in the new year.

The past year has been full of stops and starts for the huge shipments known generally as “megaloads.” The closure of one controversial route is only opening up other conflicts likely to continue into 2014.

Clearer weather in eastern Oregon and southern Idaho has helped Hillsboro, Ore., based shipper Omega Morgan make up some ground over the last several days. The shipper now has two loads en route to Alberta’s tar sands. They’re two lanes wide and nearly two stories tall.

This route is plan B. Over the summer, a federal judge closed Idaho’s scenic Highway 12 to megaloads, a victory for protesters.

Yet the alternatives are also meeting resistance. Adrienne Cronebaugh of the Kootenai Environmental Alliance in north Idaho is worried about a new plan by the shipper Mammoet. It’s trying to send a trio of 1.6 million-pound loads through Coeur d’Alene in early 2014.

“…I don’t want to see Lake Coeur d’Alene’s shoreline become a corridor for industrial megaloads shipments,” Cronebaugh says.

The pushback to megaloads has prompted shipping companies to step up local public outreach efforts. A representative of Mammoet says added security is also now a standard part of the cost of moving a megaload.

~~~~~~~~~

Photo by Jessica Robinson

 

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Second megaload remains parked in Pendleton today

December 24, 2013 — Rising Tide is honored to have taken part in last night’s ceremony. Thank you to the Umatilla tribal members who have been working so tirelessly. It looks like last’s nights prayers and songs paid off–  the second megaload remains parked in Pendleton today!

Here’s wishing a Christmas stocking full of dirty tar sands oil to Omega Morgan CEO John McCalla, for his reckless profiteering from climate change.

Holiday Solidarity to All!

Protesters get mega-loud: Tribes sing, hold ceremony as second megaload begins trek

George Plavin, December 23, 2013 —  Pendleton climate activists joined in solidarity with Umatilla tribal members and elders Monday night as the second of three controversial megaloads rolls through Eastern Oregon to the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada.About 50 people gathered along Highway 395 near St. Anthony Hospital in Pendleton, where the convoy was parked after departing the Port of Umatilla late Sunday.  Together, they held signs and sang songs of prayer while police kept watch over the demonstration.Industrial hauler Omega Morgan, of Hillsboro, is trucking the enormous shipment of oil refinery equipment on its route south through the John Day Valley, before crossing east over state lines into Idaho.  Protesters were attempting to block the first load in Hermiston and Pendleton, speaking out against oil extraction that damages the environment.

“We are contributing and allowing our state to be used to expand one of the most environmentally destructive projects on the planet,”said Trip Jennings, of the activist group Portland Rising Tide. “We’re assuming the risk, and seeing none of the benefit.  All we’re seeing is more carbon coming from the tar sands.”

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, meanwhile, has opposed the Oregon Department of Transportation’s decision to permit the megaloads over ceded land without proper consultation between state and tribal governments.

Protesters were active attempting to block the first load through Oregon, which finally crossed over into Idaho over the weekend. The second load is similar in size, though slightly smaller 380 feet long, 23 feet wide and weighing approximately 804,000 pounds.

Tribal elder Art McConville said they remain concerned about anything causing damage to the land and ecosystem.  Their prayers asked for safety and protection, not only for the environment but everybody involved along the route as well.

“It’s a lot of sacred area out there,”McConville said.  “There’s a lot of ceremonial activities that go on all across the land.  We’re concerned about anything that could contaminate the earth.”

Alexandra Amonette, of Richland, Wash., said climate change is the most important issue affecting everyone today.  People have to learn to stop burning fossil fuels and transition to a clean energy economy, she said.

“We absolutely can’t do these tar sands, where this megaload is going,”Amonette said.  “They’re unconventional fossil fuels. We can’t burn them up, or we will overheat the planet.”

In addition, Jennings said groups are looking to keep the route from becoming a long-term industrial corridor to reach the oil sands. Erik Zander, project manager with Omega Morgan, has said there are no plans to use the route beyond these three loads.

The megaload is only permitted to travel between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m., with occasional daytime travel on rural highways under special conditions outlined in the project permit, according to ODOT. It will not travel Tuesday or Wednesday during the Christmas holiday.

Drivers can expect delays of up to 20 minutes when the megaload is on the road. Updates will be posted online at www.tripcheck.com.

Contact: George Plaven at gplaven@eastoregonian.com

Activists confront ODOT officials, demand end to tar sands megaload permits

Portland, OR, Friday December 20, 2013 — Climate justice activists entered the Oregon
Department of Transportation offices in downtown Portland to stop the movement of the tar sands
megaloads through Umatilla and Warm Springs tribal land in Eastern Oregon.

The group presented two letters to ODOT officials outlining their objections to the loads on moral and legal grounds –one by
Portland Rising Tide, the other by the Tribal Government of Umatilla (recently sent to Kitzhaber).

This is the seventh regional action in a little over two weeks against the megaloads. The actions started
December 1st, when two were arrested for successfully blocking the megaload from leaving the Port of
Umatilla. On Monday of this week, resistance continued when activists locked themselves to two
disabled vehicles in front of the 450 ton, 376 foot long megaload, blocking its route along highway 26
outside of John Day. Police arrested 16 activists that evening, violently extracting them from the
blockade and indiscriminately arresting everyone at the site. One minor was arrested and released, and
total bail was set at $150,000 for the other 15 arrestees.

On Tuesday, ODOT gave special permission for the megaloads to move during the daytime, outside the bounds

of their permits, waiving public safety concerns without public notice.
The Oregon Department of Transportation has been providing permits for the megaloads to travel
without permission or consultation from the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla and Warm Springs First
Nations. In a recent letter to Governor Kitzhaber from the Umatilla Tribe’s Board of Trustees, Chair Gary
Burke challenged the megaload trespass, citing the absence of mandatory consultation with the tribes,
and the role of tar sands extraction in harming indigenous communities and fueling global climate change.
Government-to-government consultation of this kind was mandated by Governor Kitzhaber in Executive
Order 96-30 and has since become statute in ORS 182.162168.

At the 13th annualgovernment-to-government summit initiated by the order, Kitzhaber emphasized “This is far more than a
statutory obligation… for me, it is a deep personal obligation.”

After gathering in front of the building people entered and delivered the letter to ODOT staff. In their
letter to ODOT, Portland Rising Tide emphasized the actions of those arrested on Monday night,
“Monday people took this risk to do what you have refused to do: to stop the movement of materials
that damage the public good, destroy the global commons, and shred indigenous rights,” said Toby
Seldon of Portland Rising Tide.
“The fossil fuel industry is aggressively trying to transform the Pacific Northwest into a fossil fuel
corridor, with terminal proposals and now with the megaloads, and ODOT’s willingness to permit these
actions is outrageous — we will do everything we can to stop them. ” said David Osborn of Portland
Rising Tide.

Portland Rising Tide is an all-volunteer organization that collaborates with an alliance of groups
organizing to stop the megaloads. We have been accepting contributions to cover the legal expenses of
current and future resistance to the megaload shipments. Donations can be made

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$ 150,000 in Bail Set for Those Arrested in December 16 Blockade – We Need your Support!

The people arrested Monday night blockading the tar sands megaload were arraigned Wednesday, December 18, in the Justice Court of Grant County. Fourteen were charged with five misdemeanors, one with six and the minor arrested in the action was released Monday. Each person has had bail set at $ 10,000 for a total of $ 150,000. The arrests stem from the two blockades that were set up Monday night using two disabled vehicles to stop the controversial, 450-ton, 376-foot long tar sands megaload transported by Omega Morgan, which was delayed for several hours.

The December 16 arrest and detainment in John Day, Oregon of sixteen people included individuals who were merely in proximity to the Omega Morgan megaload now making its way through Eastern Oregon– only some of those arrested were actively protesting.  Others were observers and reporters who were standing nearby on the shoulder of the road, well within the law.

The action Monday was the sixth regional action against the Oregon megaloads in two weeks. The actions started when two were arrested successfully preventing the megaload from leaving the Port of Umatilla on December 1st. A member of the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla was arrested December 2nd trying to block the megaload. Office occupations and disruptions have taken place at Omega Morgan’s offices in Fife, WA and Hillsboro, OR, as well as the General Electric subsidiary that designed the machinery moving towards the Athabasca oil fields in Alberta.

 We need legal funds to support these folks, and to continue our work to stop these shipments from reaching the tar sands!  Please share this link and donate if you can!

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16 arrested in Eastern Oregon roadblock of megaload; further resistance expected

The Oregonian– Richard Read, December 17, 2013 —

JOHN DAY, Ore. — Police arrested 16 protesters late Monday as activists locked themselves to disabled vehicles in front of a tar-sands megaload near John Day, delaying the shipment’s passage.

“Climate justice groups stopped the movement of a controversial shipment of equipment bound for the Alberta tar sands,” said a news release issued at 1:49 a.m. Tuesday by Portland Rising Tide, an activists’ network. “Police responded and arrested 16 at the two blockade sites, using ‘pain compliance’ to extract them.”

The blockade is the second pulled off by activists slowing the 901,000-pound rig as it heads for Alberta via Oregon and Idaho. The load was first blocked Dec. 1, when two men locked themselves to the truck and had to be extracted by police, which took so long the shipment canceled its nightly move…

The Associated Press — Jeff Barnard, December 17, 2013 —

GRANTS PASS, Ore. — Protesters trying to slow a megaload of refinery equipment destined for the tar sands in Canada used people chained together in a disabled car and a trailer for roadblocks in Eastern Oregon, but authorities say the obstacles were cleared in about two hours.

Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer says 16 people from Oregon, Washington, Alaska and California were arrested Monday night in John Day on charges of disorderly conduct.

Portland Rising Tide spokesman Stephen Quirke says the moving company should expect “further resistance all along the route” as public awareness grows about how burning tar sands for energy contributes to climate change.

From John Day the load is headed across southern Idaho, then north through Montana into Alberta.

CANYON CITY, Ore. — More than a dozen megaload protesters are in the Grant County Jail Tuesday in Canyon City in northeast Oregon.

A woman who works at the jail says they were arrested overnight for disorderly conduct.

The group Rising Tide says 16 people were arrested for blocking the huge shipment of oil refinery equipment on Highway 26 outside John Day.

The group says they locked themselves to two disabled vehicles in the path of the megaload.

The crews moving the 450-ton shipment had hoped to be near the Idaho border Wednesday. The equipment is headed for the Canadian tar sands oil development via Idaho and Montana.

The megaload travels at about 35 mph and is allowed to move only at night.

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