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SHOW SOLIDARITY with OPPONENTS of the SOUTHERN LEG of KXL PIPELINE– TAR SANDS OIL BEGINS FLOWING JAN 22

Assemble outside the TransCanada offices in Umpqua Plaza–
East side of the block on the Naito Parkway sidewalk, between SW Columbia & SW Jefferson, downtown Portland–
January 22, 11:00AM-12:30PM–
We will demonstrate solidarity with the residents, tribal members, workers, landowners, farmers, ranchers, and Tar Sands Blockaders who have boldly resisted the construction of the southern leg of KXL, also known as the Gulf Coast Pipeline.
Join us in standing in support.
For reference: http://www.tarsandsblockade.org/aljazeera/ EVENT INFO: 503-705-1943

 

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Portland Rally Against the Third Megaload!

8:30 am, Thursday January 9th
O’Bryant Square – SW Park & Washington

—  As the third megaload prepares to leave the Port of Umatilla for the Tar Sands of Alberta, Canada, we are keeping pressure on local corporations and decision-makers with a clear and resounding message: Stop The Megaloads!

Join us  to rally again and show the fossil fuel industry that we will not be silenced, intimidated or stopped.

This will be the ninth regional action against the Oregon megaloads in the past month. Disruptions have taken place at Omega Morgan’s offices in Fife, WA and Hillsboro, OR, at the General Electric subsidiary where tar  sands equipment is manufactured, at ODOT’s offices in Portland, and, of  course, in the path of the megalaods in eastern Oregon.

We will be leaving O’Bryant Square and walking to the site of the rally at  8:45 am. Be prompt! Wear a rain jacket! Invite your friends! Share on Facebook!

Portland Rising Tide

PS – We’ll be having a Portland Rising Tide Orientation on Wednesday 1/22 from 6:30 – 8:30 PM at Laughing Horse Books (12 NE 10th). More details to come next week, but save the date so that you can get involved in our work!

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Feds Issue Safety Alert for Bakken Oil Trains

January 2, 2014 — Photo by Steven Lane/The Columbian —

An alert issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation on Thursday states that the crude oil coming out of the Bakken shale fields of North Dakota poses a ‘significant risk’ because it is more flammable than traditional heavy crude.

The alert was issued just days after the entire population of Casselton, North Dakota was forced to evacuate as a Bakken oil train exploded at least twice, sending fire and thick plumes of toxic smoke into the atmosphere. The oil train explosion was the third in 2013; the Lac-Mégantic, Quebec disaster killed 47 people in July.

The DOT alert and the explosions are particularly relevant for residents of Vancouver, Washington as the state considers a 380,000 barrel-per-day oil terminal proposal by Tesaro and Savage Corporations to ship Bakken oil through Vancouver to domestic and/or foreign ports. Tesaro is responsible for the October 10th pipeline failure which spewed more than 20,000 barrels of crude oil into a wheat field in North Dakota.

The final decision whether or not to allow development of the terminal rests with Washington Governor Jay Inslee and, ultimately, the public.

“Some Washington refineries are already receiving Bakken Oil by train and a handful of ports in the Northwest are considering building facilities to move the oil from trains onto ships”, Ashley Ahearn of OPB Earthfix points out.

Presently, the Washington State Energy Facility Siting Committee (EFSC) is preparing a study of the proposed terminal for the Governor. The EFSC received 31,000 public comments during the scoping process for the study.

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Partial History:

In November, fifty activists with Vancouver and Portland Rising Tide blocked entrances to the Port of Vancouver, WA with a community picket line in response to the Port’s re-leasing of public land to Tesoro/Savage for the proposed construction of the oil terminal at the Port of Vancouver.  Trucks backed up down the block as work was delayed for the morning. More here

In December, the City of Vancouver sent a list of 100 concerns to the EFSEC as part of the council’s scoping process to decide what should be included in the environmental review of the project. but fell short of opposing the project.  The City of Vancouver’s comments can be found here.

The Vancouver Port Commission rubber-stamped Tesaro/Savage’s proposal in July despite fierce public opposition, voting unanimously to approve the oil terminal lease. “With their action Tuesday, port commissioners underscored the fact that Vancouver has become an epicenter of global energy market gyrations and national environmental concerns”, wrote Aaron Corvin in the July 23 Columbian.

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Coal Oil Gas – None Shall Pass

Portland Rising Tide has had an incredible year thanks to your support and participation.

You’ve seen our work around the megaloads over the last few weeks but we’ve done so much more and we need your support to keep building this movement. Please make a donation today if you can.

Last January we started things off with an action shutting down a Chevron Station in solidarity with the Unist’ot’en via a super fun snowball fight.

Over the spring we organized a variety of interventions building up to the Climate Action on the Columbia in July. Over 1,000 people gathered to demonstrate our region’s united opposition to the proposed oil, coal and gas terminals and our willingness to take direct action as needed.

In the fall we disrupted a luncheon by Ambre energy, who want to build a coal terminal in Longview, and we shut down the Port of Vancouver in solidarity with locked out workers and in opposition to the proposed 360,000 barrel per day oil terminal proposed there.
We ended the year by blockading the tar sands megaloads in Eastern Oregon in collaboration with allies from the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla and others. Nineteen people have been arrested in actions that by building on years of previous resistance have delayed the tar sands megaloads moving through Eastern Oregon and made them controversial throughout the nation.
We are stoked! With your help in 2014, we will continue to build a climate justice movement committed to confronting the root causes of the climate crisis. This will allow us to stop the tar sands megaloads and all of the proposed oil, coal and gas terminals in our region.
Please donate if you can to support our work. Our escalated work has come with costs, including $ 20,000 for legal, bail, organizing and action funds for the megaloads alone. Please forward this email to friends who might also be able to financially support us.
We are an all-volunteer group and we look forward to your continued involvement in 2014! Without your participation none of this is possible.
Thanks for everything you do,
Portland Rising Tide
PS – If you’d prefer to use PayPal you can or email us and we can provide an address to mail checks to!
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Are you friends with us on Facebook? Visit https://www.facebook.com/PortlandRisingTide

Megaload 2 on the Move: Demonstration & Ceremony in Pendleton

Can you join us Monday, December 23 in Pendleton for a very special demonstration & ceremony lead by members of the Umatilla tribes?

Please RSVP if you can join us.

Tonight the second tar sands megaload will leave the Port of Umatilla and stop near Pendleton tomorrow morning. We are calling on all of our supporters and allies to support the tribes and be in Pendleton when it rolls Monday night. Please bring your friends and family out for a holiday action you will never forget.

Carpool meet up: 1:00 PM, 4105 N. Haight Ave. Portland – corner of Mason & Haight.
Pendleton meet up: 5:30 PM, Wildhorse Casino Business Center 46510 Wildhorse Blvd, Pendleton, OR

At the casino we will discuss the plan for the evening and prepare to head out to the megaload nearby. After the gathering at the megaload we will bear witness to its departure en route to expanding the tar sands. People will be able to return to Portland at that point around 9 PM.

There have been seven actions over the last three weeks in the escalating resistance against the loads. Actions have occurred at Omega Morgan’s offices in Seattle and Portland, the Oregon Department of Transportation, the designer of the tar sands equipment in Washington and 19 have been arrested in three blockades.

While many have been arrested in the past few weeks, we are not asking people to risk arrest tomorrow, but to be there in support and solidarity with the many front lines communities resisting the tar sands. Can you help us by sharing our event on Facebook and emailing this page to your friends and family?

If you join us please be prepared to provide your own fuel, food and lodging (if desired).

We hope to see you tomorrow!

Portland Rising Tide

PS – We still need financial support for legal expenses and our organizing against the megaloads. We’ve raised almost $ 16,000 but need to raise $ 20,000 dollars to deal with the expenses we’ve had thus far. If you can make a donation please do so! Please share with others who might be interested and encourage them to donate.

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$15,000 for Bail Bonds Raised for Those Arrested in December 16 Blockade — We Still Need your Support!

The public along with our friends and allies has rallied in solidarity with  those arrested in a second December blockade of a giant tar sands equipment shipment.

Rising Tide thanks all for your incredible support!

Despite the excessive $10,000 bail  for each of the 15 people arrested in Monday’s “megaload” action, your contributions and commitment also demonstrate robust public opposition to the Alberta tar sands extraction.  Together we will continue to oppose the corporations that profit from  environmental devastation and the US and Canadian governments that subsidize the fossil fuel industry.

The December 16 arrest and detainment in John Day, Oregon of sixteen people included individuals who were merely in proximity to the Omega Morgan megaload now making its way through Montana– only some of those arrested were actively protesting.  Others were observers and reporters who were standing nearby on the shoulder of the road, well within the law.

The action was the sixth in the region against the Oregon megaloads in two weeks. The actions started when two were arrested successfully preventing the megaload from leaving the Port of Umatilla on December 1st. A member of the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla was arrested December 2nd trying to block the megaload. Office occupations and disruptions have taken place at Omega Morgan’s offices in Fife, WA and Hillsboro, OR, as well as the General Electric subsidiary that designed the machinery moving towards the Athabasca oil fields in Alberta.

The people arrested Monday night blockading the tar sands megaload were arraigned Wednesday, December 18, in the Justice Court of Grant County. Fourteen were charged with five misdemeanors, one with six and the minor arrested in the action was released Monday. Each person has had bail set at $ 10,000 for a total of $150,000. The arrests stem from the two blockades that were set up Monday night using two disabled vehicles to stop the controversial, 450-ton, 376-foot long tar sands megaload transported by Omega Morgan, which was delayed for several hours.

Rising Tide has been planning further resistance all along the route and locally in Portland.  At the same time, members the Umatilla have been working within their community to galvanize resistance and take the lead in this struggle.  Nearly the entire Oregon leg of the proposed route cuts through the Umatilla tribe’s ancestral lands.

If you’d like to get involved in any way, whether locally or along the route, let us know by filling out  this form!

And with legal fees mounting, we still need your cash! Please share this link and donate if you can!  

This is an important opportunity to take action to block or delay equipment headed for what many have called the most destructive project on the planet. The next few weeks will be a perfect time to expand all of our activist skill sets, and we look forward to collaborating with you.

In Solidarity,

Portland Rising Tide

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Follow the load on the Megaload Tracker

Latest NewsRecent and Upcoming Events

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Vancouver fails to oppose oil terminal

Tesoro Corp. and Savage Companies want to spend up to $100 million to build a 42-acre oil-handling operation involving Port of Vancouver, Washington sites.  The 380,000 barrel per day oil terminal would be the largest such operation in the Northwest (Aaron Corvin, The Columbian).  The city of Vancouver requested that state regulators conduct a  “thorough oil-terminal study”  but failed to oppose the oil terminal or request a comprehensive environmental review.

The City of Vancouver sent its concerns to the state Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) in December as part of the council’s scoping process to decide what should be included in the environmental review of the project. The EFSEC will study the proposed terminal and send recommendations to Governor Jay Insley in 2014.  The final decision whether or not to allow development of the terminal rests with the Governor and, ultimately, the public.

On November 4, 2013, fifty activists with Vancouver and Portland Rising Tide blocked entrances to the Port of Vancouver, WA with a community picket line in response to the Port’s re-leasing of public land to Tesoro/Savage for the proposed construction of the oil terminal at the Port of Vancouver.  Trucks backed up down the block as work was delayed for the morning. More here

The Vancouver and Portland chapters of Rising Tide will continue to monitor the Tesaro/Savage oil terminal proposal and update these pages as public opposition mounts and developments occur.

Photo: Steven Lane, The Columbian

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The following article by Aaron Corvin was published in the Columbian on December 10, 2013

Vancouver neighborhoods cut off from fire and police protection by increased train traffic. A highly volatile commodity traveling near homes. An industrial area prone to liquefying in an earthquake.

Those are among more than 100 areas of concern the city of Vancouver wants state regulators to include in their examination of the environmental impacts of a proposed oil-by-rail operation at the Port of Vancouver.

City officials on Monday presented to the City Council a draft 12-page document outlining Vancouver’s concerns about the proposal by Tesoro Corp. and Savage Companies to run a facility capable of handling as much as 380,000 barrels of crude per day for eventual conversion into transportation fuels. It would be the largest such operation in the Northwest.

The city will send its concerns to the state Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council, or EFSEC, as part of the council’s scoping process to decide what should be included in the environmental review of the project. The deadline for submitting remarks is Dec. 18.

Senior Planner Jon Wagner told city councilors that thousands of people have submitted comments to EFSEC. “I feel confident the project will be thoroughly reviewed,” he said.

Project opponents want the city to request a comprehensive environmental review and to oppose the project. They include Jim Eversaul, a Vancouver resident and retired U.S. Coast Guard chief engineer, who was among 11 people who spoke to city councilors last month. “It’s just not that many jobs for the price,” he said of the oil-handling facility.

The city’s concerns reflect many of those raised by opponents, including potential oil spills, detrimental impacts to the city’s waterfront redevelopment plan and climate change. But the city isn’t taking a position on the oil terminal, according to its scoping comments. Instead, the city “encourages EFSEC to require a full and comprehensive analysis of the probable, significant adverse environmental impacts of the entire project.”

In an email to The Columbian, Rebecca Boucher, a spokeswoman for Savage, said the company and Tesoro declined to comment for this story.

More here

Protesters target meeting at megaload company

The Associated Press — December 12, 2013– Portland, OR  —  Protesters in the Portland suburb of Hillsboro interrupted a meeting Thursday at the headquarters of a moving company transporting a truckload of oil refinery equipment to a tar sands project in Canada.

About 30 protesters walked through the company’s gates and into the meeting, where they blocked a projector screen, sang songs and left peacefully, protesters and police said.

Hillsboro police spokesman Michael Rouches said no one was cited or arrested.

“They were very peaceful,” Rouches said. “They were saying whatever they needed to say, and they split.”

The protesters from Portland Rising Tide object to Hillsboro, Ore.-based Omega Morgan’s involvement in hauling equipment for the tar sands project, which they say will irreversibly damage the environment, and what they see as capitulation by the government to a corporation without allowing for public input.

Calls to Omega Morgan were not immediately returned Thursday afternoon.

Omega Morgan is operating a giant rig, 380 feet long and 22 feet wide, hauling a megaload of water purification equipment from the Port of Umatilla in Oregon, destined for Alberta, Canada.

Environmentalists have objected to the shipment, saying it adds to global warming.

The rig is allowed to travel only at night and must pull over at intervals to let traffic by. The convoy includes about 20 people. Winter weather has slowed its progress, as have other protests.

Umatilla tribal members say they weren’t adequately consulted by the government about the load’s trip through Eastern Oregon territory, where they have a treaty interest and concerns about potential damage.

Including transport vehicles, the shipment weighs about 900,000 pounds, or 450 tons. The equipment itself is a little more than a third of the weight, about 330,000 pounds.

It is scheduled to go through Idaho and Montana before it gets to Canada.

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Vancouver asks for thorough oil-terminal study

The Columbian — Aaron Corvin — December 10, 2013

Vancouver neighborhoods cut off from fire and police protection by increased train traffic. A highly volatile commodity traveling near homes. An industrial area prone to liquefying in an earthquake.

Those are among more than 100 areas of concern the city of Vancouver wants state regulators to include in their examination of the environmental impacts of a proposed oil-by-rail operation at the Port of Vancouver.

City officials on Monday presented to the City Council a draft 12-page document outlining Vancouver’s concerns about the 42-acre  operation proposed by Tesoro Corp. and Savage Companies to run a facility capable of handling as much as 380,000 barrels of crude per day for eventual conversion into transportation fuels. It would be the largest such operation in the Northwest.

The city will send its concerns to the state Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council, or EFSEC, as part of the council’s scoping process to decide what should be included in the environmental review of the project. The deadline for submitting remarks is Dec. 18.

Senior Planner Jon Wagner told city councilors that thousands of people have submitted comments to EFSEC. “I feel confident the project will be thoroughly reviewed,” he said.

Project opponents want the city to request a comprehensive environmental review and to oppose the project. They include Jim Eversaul, a Vancouver resident and retired U.S. Coast Guard chief engineer, who was among 11 people who spoke to city councilors last month. “It’s just not that many jobs for the price,” he said of the oil-handling facility.

The city’s concerns reflect many of those raised by opponents, including potential oil spills, detrimental impacts to the city’s waterfront redevelopment plan and climate change. But the city isn’t taking a position on the oil terminal, according to its scoping comments. Instead, the city “encourages EFSEC to require a full and comprehensive analysis of the probable, significant adverse environmental impacts of the entire project.”

In an email to The Columbian, Rebecca Boucher, a spokeswoman for Savage, said the company and Tesoro declined to comment for this story.

Photo by Steven Lane, The Columbian

More here

Megaload Planning and Action Meeting II

Thanks to all who attended the Megaload Action Briefing and Planning Meeting  on Thursday night!  We had an update from the actions in Umatilla over the past weekend when the first megaload left the Port of Umatilla on Sunday, December 1.   Special thanks to Cathy Sampson-Kruse, an Umatilla tribal elder, and  Kayla Godowa of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs for sharing their deep commitment to climate, sacred lands and our responsibility to our decedents for 7 generations.

We discussed the work of Portland Rising Tide, the tar sands, and the next two megaload shipments planned for December and January.  It is heartening for us to see such a tremendous response.

We have been offered a really nice space for a follow-up  Action and Planning Meeting on  Saturday, December 7. Please join us at:
Flux, 412 NW Couch St, at 4:45.
 
We’ll continue to discuss plans for next week, as well as establishing connections with each to carry this campaign forward. We are especially excited to see new faces! Invite your friends and join us!
This is an important opportunity to take action to block or delay equipment headed for what many have called the most destructive project on the planet.
The next few weeks will be a perfect time to expand your activist skill set, and we look forward to seeing everyone there on Saturday, December 7.
Cheers,
Portland Rising Tide

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